Articles Posted in Domestic Violence

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A man who is a federal corrections officer at the Victorville Federal Penitentiary has been arrested for domestic violence, for allegedly beating his live-in girlfriend so badly that she had to be hospitalized. Officer Robert Thompson already had prior domestic battery convictions before this incident, and officials from the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Victorville station say that under California law, he should have been fired from the penitentiary and lost his firearm privileges upon his first conviction.

A detective investigating the case says that the man had been beating his girlfriend for the last few years, but that this time, he had kicked her head, ribs, and face, rendering her unconscious to the point that she had to be hospitalized.

The woman then left the area, afraid for her safety, and hospital workers were the ones who reported her injuries to police. Thompson tried to evade police and continued working at the penitentiary where he was later arrested on domestic violence, assault with a deadly weapon, and suspicion of criminal threats. In certain cases, use of a body part to inflict serious and potentially fatal injuries can be considered as using a deadly weapon.

At Sagaria Law, P.C., or attorneys are experienced at helping people who have been the victims of domestic violence. We can help you obtain a temporary restraining order (TRO) that will prevent the violent party from approaching you, your home, your place of work, or your vehicle. A TRO can protect you from the person that is abusing you, and we can accompany you in court where we can help you prove your domestic violence case.
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According to new findings by the U.S. Department of Justice, domestic violence incidents seems to have gone down by more than 50% from between 1993 and 2004. This, however, does not accurately bring to light the often-ignored problem of male victims of domestic violence.

The DOJ’s National Crime Victimization Survey was conducted by talking to members of sample household regarding crime. Participants were asked questions such as, “Did you call the police to report something that happened to you which you thought was a crime?” and “Has anyone attacked or threatened you?” During these questions, male victims of domestic violence were more likely to respond “no” than were their female counterparts.

According to research results, male domestic violence victims are less likely to report such crimes. A lot of men reportedly believe that police officers won’t take them seriously. They may also worry that their female abusers will turn the tables on them and claim that they were abused instead. Fathers who are victims of domestic violence may also worry that reporting the abuse could lead to a legal separation and divorce, which could result in their abuser getting custody of the children.

According to the survey’s results, men were less likely to see the domestic violence abuse they suffered as a crime. Many of them also considered asking for help to be cowardly or unmanly. They also seemed to see their female partner’s violence as just her being “moody,” “angry” or “hormonal.”
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U.S. Senator Joseph Biden is drafting a new bill that would create a network of 100,000 legal volunteers who would work for domestic violence victims. Biden is the author of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act that developed and funded federal programs to aid domestic violence victims.

Studies by the Institute for Law and Justice and the National Center for Victims and Crime say that only 170,000 low income survivors of domestic violence obtain legal representation for their case each year. This figure is less than 20% of the more than 1 million people who become victims of domestic violence annually.

Biden believes that domestic violence is an issue that needs to be addressed every year by the government. “Combating violence in the home is like cutting the grass,” said Biden.

If approved, Biden’s bill would develop a network of attorneys willing to volunteer their services in representing domestic violence victims. The bill would also establish a fund to help lawyers who spend most of their professional life representing domestic violence victims by making it easier for these attorneys to pay back their school loans.
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A California state auditor has found that only about 50% of domestic batterers that have been ordered to join an intervention program ever complete their training, while up to 25% of the individuals who were convicted of domestic violence never even join the program-nor do these batterers get penalized for the truancy, because the courts are never notified that these individuals did not complete the training.

25,000 convicted batterers, who were supposed to join an intervention program (a year long course that involves counseling), were surveyed for the results, says Elaine Howle, the state auditor. Her office also interviewed probation workers in all 58 California Counties. They also reviewed specific cases in Riverside County, Los Angeles County, Butte County, and San Mateo County.

Officials say the failure to complete an intervention program is probably a cause for repeat offenses.

Domestic Violence Statistics For California:
· In 2004,169 murders were committed as a result of domestic violence.

· California law enforcement agencies reported 181,362 domestic violence calls in 2005.
(Department of Justice, Criminal Justice Statistics Center)
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Domestic Violence Awareness Month takes place every October to raise awareness of domestic violence, remember the millions of victims who have been injured or killed as a result of domestic violence, and honor its survivors.

In Santa Clara County, three Kaiser medical professionals, Lisa Munoz, Cassandra Floyd, and Stephanie Rodriguez, were honored on October 4 with a fountain dedicated to their memory and the memories of all victims of domestic violence.

Optical services employee Munoz was killed by an ex-boyfriend in 1999. Floyd, an OB-GYN at Kaiser Permanente’s Santa Teresa Medical Center, was murdered by her ex-husband in 2001. Rodriguez, a medical education coordinator, was killed by her husband in 2003.
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